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September 08
CLOSED November 27 and 28

​Both offices will be closed for Thanksgiving on Thursday and Friday,

November 27 and 28

September 08
Santa Fe office CLOSED Friday Nov. 7

​We apologize for the inconvenience.

September 02
Los Alamos Tuesday office hours extended to 5:30 PM

​We have added an hour at the end of the day in Los Alamos on Tuesdays so that we are now open until 5:30 PM.

September 02
Free interactive asthma webinar Sept. 16

Interested in learning more about the treatment and control of asthma or would you like the opportunity to
ask a physician all of your asthma related questions?
 
Join us September 9th at 8:00 PM EST or September 16th at 10:00 PM EST for an interactive, live webinar!  Follow one of these links to register or scan the QR code below.
 
September 9th

www.gotomeeting.com/register/718892126

 

 
September 16th  

 

 
Feel free to share this link with your family and friends so they can participate too!
 

 

July 14
Dr. Sussman interviewed on the radio

​Please tune in to KSFR radio at 101.1 on Tuesday August 12 and Tuesday August 19 at 6:30 PM for an interview with Dr. Sussman on the East-West Medicine program. After the show airs, a podcast will be available at this link: www.eastwestmedicine.libsyn.com<http://www.eastwestmedicine.libsyn.com/>  This is a great opportunity to learn more details about allergies from our senior physician!

March 24
Santa Fe office hours extended!

​Santa Fe clinic hours have been extended on Wednesdays and Fridays! New hours:

Monday through Thursday 8:30 AM-5:30 PM

Friday 8:30 AM-4:30 PM

March 05
Why Allergy Partners?

 

More than 20 years ago in Asheville, North Carolina, Allergy Partners was founded on a simple premise: by working together, allergists can identify and implement best practices, which will result in improved patient care. By following that premise, we have grown to almost 100 allergists and 800 team members in 17 states. We are proud to provide care for more than a half-million patients. We are even more proud of the quality of care we provide.
 
All Allergy Partners physicians are certified by the American Board of Allergy, Asthma, and Immunology. That certification requires certification by the American Board of Internal Medicine or the American Board of Pediatrics followed by a minimum of two years of fellowship training. As a result, our physicians are uniquely qualified to manage conditions including:
 
• allergic rhinitis
• asthma
• allergic conjunctivitis
• chronic cough
• chronic sinusitis
• urticaria and angioedema
• atopic dermatitis
• contact dermatitis
• anaphylaxis(bee sting, drugs, food, or other causes)
• immune deficiencies
 
To make certain we remain on the cutting edge of our specialty, we created the Clinical Excellence Committee. Under the oversight of Dr. Spencer Atwater, our Chief Medical Officer, the Committee identifies opportunities for improvement, reviews pertinent medical literature and current standards, develops recommendations for optimal treatments, and engineers systems to make sure that treatment is delivered consistently. A perfect example of that is our state-of-the-art allergen immunotherapy program and extract lab. In many ways, immunotherapy is the cornerstone of the allergy specialty. To ensure that immunotherapy is as safe and effective as possible, we worked in conjunction with nationally recognized experts to develop our formulation processes and dosing recommendations. We invested in building our extract lab after seeking input from industry experts as well as the Center for Biologics Evaluation and Research. Today we produce over a quarter million vials of allergy extract annually following USP 797 guidelines for sterile allergenic extract processing. It is through this attention to detail that we can provide you assurance that the patients you entrust to us will be provided safe and effective therapy.
 
At Allergy Partners, we are committed to using the latest technology to improve patient outcomes. Each of our locations is not only using the same electronic health record, they are also configured as a single database. In this way, as opportunities to improve care become available, we can easily build and implement the forms that will encourage that care on an enterprise level. We can and do track the outcomes of that care delivery, and use that understanding to implement further change. We have published data in national allergy journals which we hope will help other practices with what we have learned.
 
We also use our information systems configuration to improve the quality of our consultations. We have an “All Doctors” listserv set up which enables our referring physicians to benefit from the expertise of not just one, but almost 100, practicing allergists. When any of our physicians confronts a particularly unusual or difficult case, he or she can immediately tap into the expertise of our entire network. With our current size, we see this oppor­tunity utilized once or twice every day. It not only provides access to much broader expertise for our patients, it also serves to educate our own physicians on a daily basis.
 
At Allergy Partners we are proud of our history and proud of the care we provide today. We are even more ex­cited about the future and the opportunities we have to deliver even better care. We have just implemented our patient portal, which increases our opportunities to interact with patients. We are in the process of developing more robust outcomes assessment capabilities. Additionally, we are exploring ways to integrate technology in ways that will help us work with our patients to make those outcomes even better. And most importantly, we are continuing to work as a group to build a patient-centered culture. As hard as we work behind the scenes to implement best practices and improve our specialty, we work just as hard to make sure our patients recognize that we care. We pledge to provide our shared patients the very best care and the best experience possible.

  
December 13
Tips for the Holidays!

Whether it's feasting on holiday meals, setting up your Christmas tree, or
visiting your pet-owning relatives, allergy triggers may be lurking.
Unfortunately, with busy schedules, travel time and the stress of the
holidays, it is easy to forget to take the proper care when dealing
with allergies and asthma.
  

Here are some tips to help keep allergies and asthma under control
this holiday season:
  
When attending holiday parties, inform the host about your food
allergy and ask about the ingredients used to prepare the meal.
  
Carry an auto-injectable dose of epinephrine when attending a holiday
party where unrecognized food allergens could be hiding. Homemade
items do not have ingredient lists and could be contaminated with
trace amounts of allergenic foods through contact with storage
containers or kitchen utensils.
  
Remind family members and friends that strict avoidance is the only
way to manage food allergies and that even one little bite can
trigger a dangerous reaction.
  
If visiting relatives' homes who own pets, take your allergy
medication before arriving in order to minimize a possible reaction.
  
Evergreens often carry microscopic mold spores. You might think you
are allergic to your Christmas tree, but it is likely that it is the
mold spores that are causing those symptoms.
  
Clean decorations and artificial trees outside before decorating.
They can gather mold and dust while in storage. Wash fabric
decorations in hot, soapy water before displaying them to remove mold
and dust.
  
When spraying artificial snow on windows or other surfaces, be sure
to follow directions. These sprays can irritate your lungs if you
inhale them.
  
Take along your own pillow with an allergen-proof cover and request
down-free pillows if staying in a hotel or at a relative's house.
Dust mites can be especially troublesome if traveling away from home.
  
Ask your relatives and friends to avoid burning wood in the
fireplace. The smoke can trigger an asthma attack.
 
The holidays can be a stressful time of year. Pay attention to your
stress level because stress can sometimes lead to asthma attacks. Deep
breathing and relaxation can help. Remember to enjoy this special season instead of trying to make everything perfect!

 

 

October 04
Halloween and Food Allergies

Halloween--how fun  for kids to dress up and eat lots of candy! However, for families with food allergic children, this holiday can be very stressful. Many treats that are handed out are off limits to these children because they either contain or have the risk of containing (through cross contact) common foods associated with allergies like milk, egg and nuts. Here are some tips to help you and your family:

 

· If a food label indicates that the product “may contain” or is “processed on shared equipment with” the ingredient to which you or your child is allergic, avoid that food! Researchers have tested products with precautionary statements and found that major food allergens such as milk, egg and peanut have been found in about 5% of these foods.
 
· Mini-size, fun-size or bite-size versions of candy may contain different ingredients than their full-size counterparts. Make no assumptions, and read all labels carefully.
 
· Buy safe treats or inexpensive trinkets/toys that you can trade with your children for unsafe candies that they have received.
 
· Take those same safe treats and give them to your neighbors to give your allergic child when he or she comes to their door.
 
· Say NO to treats that do not have full ingredient labels.
 
· If prescribed, always have your Epi-Pen available.
 
· Make a rule that no treats can be eaten while your children are trick-or-treating. They should only be consumed after inspection by you.

 
 

October 04
A primer on asthma medications

Asthma is a common lung disorder characterized by episodes of cough, wheeze and shortness of breath. Asthma is caused by inflammation of the lining of the small airways in the lungs (bronchioles) which leads to spasm or narrowing of these tubes. This spasm triggers asthma symptoms. Approximately one person in ten has asthma and 34.1 million Americans have been diagnosed with asthma. Asthma severity varies greatly from very mild to debilitating. Unfortunately, asthma can be fatal and over 4,000 Americans a year die from asthma. For the vast majority of asthmatics, however, asthma can be well controlled. Management of asthma includes avoidance of triggers, treating underlying conditions (like reflux and obesity), allergy immunotherapy (for those who have an allergic component to their asthma) and medications. This article focuses on the different types of medications that are used for asthma control.

 

 There are two basic categories of asthma medications: relievers and controllers.
 
Relievers offer temporary relief from asthma symptoms and are typically used only when needed.
· Short term beta agonists are commonly known as rescue inhalers or nebulizers. These medications temporarily relax the muscles lining our small airways thus leading to opening of these bronchioles. Common examples of these medications include albuterol (ProAir, Ventolin, Proventil) and levalbuterol (Xopenex). These medications can come in either metered dose inhalers or as a liquid that is delivered through a nebulizer machine. The metered dose inhalers consist of a pressurized canister containing medication that fits into a boot-shaped plastic mouthpiece. With most metered dose inhalers, medication is released by pushing the canister into the boot. This type of inhaled medication delivery device requires proper technique. In those patients where poor technique is a concern, a spacer may be used. A spacer holds medication after it's released, making it easier to inhale the full dose. If you do have asthma, it is very important to keep track of how often you need either a rescue inhaler or nebulizer. In general, if you need a rescue treatment (excluding pre-exercise) because of experiencing actual breathing symptoms more than twice per week, then that is too much. In that scenario you need to see your trusted health care provider.
 
· Systemic steroids are large doses of corticosteroids that are given orally or intravenously for acute and severe allergic attacks. Examples include prednisone, prednisolone (OraPred) and methylprednisolone (often prescribed as a Medrol Dose Pack). These are medications that are used in emergency situations and chronic use of them can lead to significant deleterious side effects.

Controllers are anti-inflammatory medications which prevent or heal the inflammation inside the lungs. These are generally used every day as a preventive medication in those patients with persistent asthma. The criteria for persistent disease include needing your rescue inhaled medications more than twice per week, waking up from sleep because of asthma symptoms more than twice per month or needing systemic steroids for asthma attacks more than twice in the past year. This is not a complete list; in the end, the judgment of your health care provider is most important in determining whether you need asthma controller medication. Controller medications should be taken every day to prevent asthma symptoms from emerging

 

  • Inhaled steroids are anti-inflammatory inhaled medications that are the most effective and commonly used treatments for long-term control of asthma. They reduce swelling and tightening in your airways. Examples include fluticasone (Flovent), budesonide (Pulmicort), mometasone (Asmanex), beclomethasone (Qvar) and ciclesonide (Alvesco). Some of these medications come in a metered dose inhaler, others in a dry powder inhaler that cannot be used with a spacer. The only one of the above that comes in a nebulized version is budesonide. 
· Leukotreine modifiers are pills that are taken every day that block the effects of leukotreines which are chemicals involved in the immune system that can cause asthma symptoms. Examples include montelukast (Singulair), zafirlukast (Accolate) and zileuton (Zyflo).
 
· Combination inhalers are inhaled asthma medications that contain both an inhaled steroid and a long acting version of albuterol. These medications are typically prescribed to those patients who have uncontrolled asthma even when taking a daily inhaled steroid and/or a leukotreine modifier. Examples of these medications include fluticasone and salmeterol (Advair), budesonide and formoterol (Symbicort), and mometasone and formoterol (Dulera). Most of these are available only in a metered dose inhaler while Advair is available in both a metered dose inhaler and a dry powder inhaler.
 
· For those patients with allergy induced asthma that is not well controlled with maximum doses of the above medications, omalizumab (Xolair) is available. This is a humanized antibody used to reduce the sensitivity to inhaled or ingested allergens. It does this by blocking the effect of immunoglobulin E (IgE) which is an important mediator of allergic disease. This medication is administered via injection either every 2 or 4 weeks depending on the individual patient who meets certain criteria.

If you suffer from asthma you should know what specific medications you take and make sure you are clear on when/how to take them. You should also keep track of how often you need your rescue treatments, how often you experience night-time asthma symptoms that awaken you from sleep, and how many bursts of systemic steroids you have taken in the past 12 months for severe asthma attacks.

 

 

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 About this blog

 
 

Welcome to our blog site! Stay tuned to get the latest news. We will share tips and techniques for living with and managing your Allergies & Asthma. We look forward to sharing useful resources with our patients!