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The leaders in Allergy & Asthma Care.

We pride ourselves in taking the time to understand each patient’s concerns and work effectively alongside our highly skilled support staff to make certain we provide the highest quality care available.

Allergy Partners of the midlands

is a member of the nation’s largest single specialty practice in Allergy, Asthma and Immunology. Our dedicated Physicians will develop a comprehensive treatment program to bring your life into balance.

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 Recent Posts

 
  • Immunotherapy (Allergy Shots): The Allergy Partners Way
    June 23, 2015
    Allergy immunotherapy, more commonly referred to as allergy shots, is the most effective treatment available for environmental allergies. By reducing your reactions to pollens, pet dander, molds and dust mites, allergy shots reduce symptoms and your need for medication. While it is a highly effective treatment, immunotherapy does not contain medication and is composed of natural protein extracts from allergens. By giving gradually increasing doses of the allergen, immunotherapy teaches your immune system to tolerate exposure to the allergens in the environment. It is highly effective in treating sinus and eye symptoms along with asthma, sinusitis and allergy induced eczema. To assure that proper treatment is provided, immunotherapy should always be prescribed by a board certified allergist. Certification by the American Board of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology assures that your doctor has received at least 2 years of additional training specifically in treating allergic diseases. Only through this intense training can a doctor gain full knowledge of immunotherapy treatment.
  • Peanut Allergy: Advances in Diagnosis and Treatment
    June 2, 2015
    It is estimated that food allergy affects approximately 5% of adults and 8% of children, with peanut allergy nearing approximately 2% of the population. A peanut allergy is when the immune system makes a type of antibody called IgE towards specific proteins in peanut. When a person with peanut allergy is exposed to these peanut proteins, the peanut specific IgE antibodies cause allergy cells (mast cells, basophils, eosinophils, etc.) to create an allergic reaction. The symptoms of an IgE mediated allergic reaction generally happen within minutes to two hours after exposure to the food and can include: itching, flushing, hives, swelling, difficulty breathing, repeated coughing, chest tightness, wheezing, hoarseness, change in voice, dizziness, weakness, fainting, low blood pressure, nausea, vomiting, abdominal cramps, or diarrhea. Such reactions can be life threatening.
  • Increased severity of allergic reactions in women: Is estrogen to blame?
    May 12, 2015
    Previous research indicates that women tend to experience more severe allergic reactions - anaphylaxis – than men. The reason behind this has remained somewhat of a mystery, however, a new study published in The Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology suggests estrogen could be to blame. Researchers from the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases have explored sex-dependent differences in a mouse model of anaphylaxis to explore how female sex hormones, estrogen, may be involved.
  • ASK THE EXPERT: "I HAVE HIVES. I MUST HAVE ALLERGIES."
    April 29, 2015
    Your Allergy Partners physician would likely respond to the above statement with a cautious “maybe.” Hives, like many of the responses of the body, can be caused by many stimuli, not just allergies. Take, for instance, the similar example of sneezing. Sneezing is a common allergic symptom; however, we all know that non-allergic stimuli can cause sneezing, from infections due to the common cold to irritants in the air (pepper, for example). In a likewise fashion, hives can be due to allergic and non-allergic causes.
  • Intranasal influenza vaccination
    April 28, 2015
    Nobody likes getting a shot, especially children. However, US health guidelines recommend annual influenza vaccination of children, especially those with asthma, and including those with egg allergy. Live attenuated influenza vaccine (LAIV) is an intranasal vaccine administered via the nose licensed for use in children. However, this vaccine contains egg protein and it is currently suggested that it not be used on children with egg allergy. Furthermore, North American guidelines recommend against its use in children with asthma. Thus, asthmatic or egg allergic children receive a traditional flu shot.
 

 Our Locations

 
Allergy PartnersColumbia, SC (803) 794-3581